X
Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
Get free sample report

Compare Software Solutions
Visit the TEC store to compare leading software solutions by funtionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.
Compare Now
 

 business intelligence consult case study


A One-stop Event for Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing Information
The Data Warehousing Institute (TDWI) hosts quarterly World Conferences to help organizations involved in data warehousing, business intelligence, and

business intelligence consult case study  One-stop Event for Business Intelligence and Data Warehousing Information The Data Warehousing Institute ( TDWI ) hosts its quarterly World Conference in cities across the US to help organizations involved in data warehousing, business intelligence (BI), and performance management, by giving them access to industry experts, and providing impartial classes related to topics pertinent to the industry. As the industry grows, organizations are faced with questions about how to best access their data to drive

Read More


Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Process Manufacturing (ERP)

The simplified definition of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software is a set of applications that automate finance and human resources departments and help manufacturers handle jobs such as order processing and production scheduling. ERP began as a term used to describe a sophisticated and integrated software system used for manufacturing. In its simplest sense, ERP systems create interactive environments designed to help companies manage and analyze the business processes associated with manufacturing goods, such as inventory control, order taking, accounting, and much more. Although this basic definition still holds true for ERP systems, today its definition is expanding. Today's leading ERP systems group all traditional company management functions (finance, sales, manufacturing, human resources) and include, with varying degrees of acceptance and skill, many solutions that were formerly considered peripheral (product data management (PDM), warehouse management, manufacturing execution system (MES), reporting, etc.). While during the last few years the functional perimeter of ERP systems began an expansion into its adjacent markets, such as supply chain management (SCM), customer relationship management (CRM), business intelligence/data warehousing, and e-Business, the focus of this knowledge base is mainly on the traditional ERP realms of finance, materials planning, and human resources. The old adage is "Such a beginning, such an end", and, consequently, many ERP systems' failures could be traced back to a bad software selection. The foundation of any ERP implementation must be a proper exercise of aligning customers' IT technology with their business strategy, and subsequent software selection. This is the perfect time to create the business case and energize the entire organization towards the vision sharing and a buy in, both being the Key Success Factors (KSFs). Yet, these steps are very often neglected despite the amount of expert literature and articles that emphasize their importance.    

Start Now

Documents related to » business intelligence consult case study

Best Practices in Extending ERP: A Buyer’s Guide to ERP versus Best-of-breed Decisions


The trade-off between best-of-breed functionality and ease of integration is no longer so simple. Enterprise resource planning (ERP) software continues to expand, blurring the boundaries of core ERP functionality. The three essential factors to consider in ERP versus best-of-breed decisions are functionality, integration, and the ability to upgrade. Find out the questions you need to ask when considering an ERP extension.

business intelligence consult case study   Read More

Beyond Boundaries: A New Role for Finance in Driving Business Collaboration


The current global economic instability means firms have to quickly adapt to business conditions. This uncertainty may increase companies’ reliance on business alliances to provide as-needed skills, services, and products. To optimize these alliances, finance should enter the discussion as early as possible. Find out where finance’s true value lies when realigning strategic objectives to include business collaboration.

business intelligence consult case study   Read More

The Formula for Product Success: Focus on Flexibility and Cooperation


Jeeves has retained the concept of having a single innovative product with broad and reliable functionality, and an open architecture. But beyond the solid nature of the product, Jeeves also takes pains to communicate effectively with both customers and partners.

business intelligence consult case study   Read More

Supply Chain Cost-cutting Strategies


Process industries (chemicals, food and beverage, oil and gas, etc.) face rising manufacturing and logistics costs. And they’re finding that the old strategies for cost containment no longer pack the same punch. Some surveys show that 75 percent of all respondents are redesigning their supply chains to keep these costs in check. Are you one of them? No? You’ve got a lot of catching up to do—and very little time to do it.

business intelligence consult case study   Read More

Creating Competitive Advantage with Business Intelligence Pervasiveness


Pervasive business intelligence (BI) results when organizational culture, business processes, and technologies are designed and implemented with the goal of improving the strategic, operational, and tactical decision-making capabilities of a wide range of internal and external stakeholders. Read about creating a BI strategy and improving your BI competency.

business intelligence consult case study   Read More

Navigator One for SAP Business One


Navigator One is a suite of modules for SAP Business One—a business management software application designed specifically for small to midsize businesses (SMBs). Used by over 23,000 customers today, SAP Business One manages business functions across sales, operations, service, and financials, in an integrated software system. The Navigator One modules extend the core SAP Business One functionality in a completely integrated, same-look-and-feel option for Navigator’s customers and partners. · Production One is targeted at companies looking to track detailed costs and production processes during assembly or production. It can help production-oriented organizations mange their labor and material costs using touch-screen and bar-code collection devices.· Production One advanced planning and scheduling (APS) allows simultaneous scheduling of machines, labor, and tooling. The add-on also features dynamic inventory allocation and multilevel pegging for schedules.· Distribution One is designed for warehouse management and advanced forecasting and planning. It includes functionality for finance, sales, purchasing, customer management, stock control, and warehouse management for wholesalers and distributors.· Service One is aimed at companies that need to perform field service or depot repair and track warranties and maintenance. It can help service-oriented organizations process service calls, schedule, and dispatch technicians.· Project One provides project costing and project management for more project-oriented organizations, including firms that need to track construction-type projects.· Retail One provides point-of-sale (POS) capabilities for other over-the-counter (OTC) sales or bar-code/touch-screen-enabled retail sales. It supports credit cards and debit cards transactions, customer loyalty tracking, and store sales and inventory tracking. Navigator also provides additional functionality for rules-based product configuration, advanced shipping, credit card transactions, bin management, revenue recognition, return merchandise authorizations (RMAs), and bar-code data collection.

business intelligence consult case study   Read More

BUSINESS FIRST: Business Process Management (BPM) Competitor Analysis Report


Business process management (BPM) defines, enables, and manages the exchange of enterprise information through the semantics of a business process view, which involves employees, customers, partners, applications, and databases.

business intelligence consult case study   Read More

Business Intelligence that Works: Getting True Value out of Your Business Intelligence Investment


With business intelligence (BI), decision-makers can feel the organization’s pulse, evaluate the performance of key business functions, and take action based on their analysis. However, many organizations invest time, money, and resources in BI processes, only to waste their newfound capabilities. Why? And, more importantly, how do you ensure that your BI solution won’t be one of them?

business intelligence consult case study   Read More

New Era of on-Demand Business Intelligence Solutions


* In the On-Demand Business Intelligence Solutions report, you ll learn about the market trends reshaping business today,the steady growth in popu...

business intelligence consult case study   Read More

Orchestrate Your Business with Integrated Business Planning


Learn how your company can reap the financial and competitive rewards of ibp in ibp: redesigning planning for a more dynamic business.

business intelligence consult case study   Read More