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 evaluating vendors bi


BI Hits the Road III: Two Niche Vendors Considered
As I’m writing this post, more software vendors are launching their mobile business intelligence (BI) solutions. So I’ve decided to hurry up and start talking

evaluating vendors bi  relevant to consider when evaluating a mobile BI solution. Mobile platform . This is the type of mobile operating system on which the mobile BI solution can run. Connectivity and integration . Many organizations need to connect the new mobile solution to a pre-existing BI platform or other types of systems. Can you connect or integrate your mobile BI application with other traditional BI applications? Architecture . How is the BI platform installed: is it hosted, or on-premise? And how is information

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Business Intelligence (BI) RFI / RFP Template

Reporting and Analysis, Analytics, Data Warehousing, Workflow, Data Integration, Support, and System Requirements  

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Strategic Considerations for Evaluating Enterprise Performance Management Solutions


Consolidation in the enterprise performance management (EPM) market has led to a glut of misleading, and sometimes overstated, vendor claims. This has served to confuse end users evaluating solutions, just at the time when an EPM strategy is so important—particularly for organizations looking to broaden their EPM strategies. Find out what you need to know before you start evaluating EPM solutions for your organization.

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Mid-market ERP Vendors Leveraging (and Occasionally Outdoing) Microsoft’s “Plumbing” - Part 1


My recent blog post on what 2010 might have meant to Microsoft’s business solutions reflected on the highly publicized mid-2010 launch of Microsoft Office 2010, SharePoint Server 2010, and Visio 2010. For the hundreds of thousands of people around the world who use some combination of one or more of Microsoft Dynamics ERP products, Microsoft Dynamics CRM, Microsoft Office, and Microsoft SharePoint

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
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About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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J.D. Edwards - A Collaboration Thought Leader Or A Disguised ERP Follower? Part 2: Evaluating J.D. Edwards


Like most of its peers, J.D. Edwards is hoping to rebound by focusing on Internet collaboration and extended-ERP applications. The company has also differentiated itself from competitors by embedding Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) into its OneWorld product. While J.D. Edwards' move into the EAI arena is indisputably risky, we commend its determination to bite the bullet and include integration systems into the core product offering. However, we also believe that managing this large application portfolio, much of which involves partnering or extensive integration and customization, will be cumbersome. Part 2 presents an evaluat

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Logi 9 Business Intelligence Platform: Business Intelligence (BI) Competitor Analysis Report


This business intelligence (BI) knowledge base covers a full range of BI functionality. BI applications enable real time, interactive access, analysis, and manipulation of mission-critical corporate information. BI users are able to access and leverage vast amounts of information to analyze relationships and understand trends that support business decisions. This knowledge base covers everything from data mining to analytics, querying, reporting, workflow, and in-depth analysis.

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Five BI Success Factors for the Midsize Organization: Tactical Guidelines for Effective BI Deployment


Midsize businesses feel the most pressure to boost revenue and increase profits—and have smaller margins for error. Achieving your goals requires making smart, timely decisions that are backed by solid data. With a business intelligence (BI) solution, you can make timely informed decisions and improve productivity, while maximizing value and return. Find out about the five success factors for implementing a BI solution.

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TEC 2014 Mobile BI Buyer's Guide


Once considered a nice-to-have, mobility is now standard in most business intelligence (BI) applications. Most traditional BI and analytics software providers have a complementary mobile offering, and new software offerings are emerging that provide BI functions solely for mobile platforms. This buyer’s guide surveys the mobile BI landscape and describes some of the more important solutions in this space. This guide will help you understand the various types of software offerings on the market, give you insight into what your peers are looking for in mobile BI solutions, provide an overview of the main features and functions of mobile BI solutions, and show you how these solutions can help you transform your business.

Business intelligence (BI) has been overrun by mobile technology usage—once considered a nice-to-have, mobility is now standard in most BI applications. Most traditional BI and analytics software providers have a complementary mobile offering, and new software offerings are emerging that provide BI functions solely for mobile platforms.

This buyer’s guide surveys the mobile BI landscape and describes some of the more important solutions in this space. This guide will help you understand the various types of software offerings on the market, give you insight into what your peers are looking for in mobile BI solutions, provide an overview of the main features and functions of mobile BI solutions, and show you how these solutions can help you transform your business.

The buyer’s guide further presents a breakdown of standard mobile BI product functionality and details how a select list of vendors supports those requirements.

Lastly, the guide presents a range of real-life case studies that highlight client successes and thought leadership about relevant BI issues and challenges, and the solutions vendors are offering to address them.



Table of Contents


Preface

About this Guide

Mobile BI: State of the Market

BI on the Go

Mobile BI Product Evaluation

Technology Trends in Mobile BI

TEC Resources for Mobile BI

Casebook

IBM Customer Success Story: Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium

IBM Product Profile: Ensuring the Security of Your Mobile Business Intelligence

MicroStrategy Customer Success Story: Mobile BI Meets High Fashion

SAP Solution Brief: Accelerate Business Intelligence Adoption with Interactive, Mobile Dashboards

SAP Infographic: The Advantages of A Single Comprehensive BI Platform

Tableau Thought Leadership: Best Practices for Mobile Business Intelligence

Transpara Customer Success Story: Maximizing Operational Performance at National Grid

Transpara Customer Success Story: Western Power Deploys Visual KPI Enterprise-wide for Improved Tracking of Operational Performance

QlikTech Customer Success Story: Illes Brings a Better Experience to Its Customers with QlikView on iPad

QlikTech Product Profile: QlikView on Mobile: Beyond Reporting 76 Vendor Directory


Vendor Directory


Download the full copy of the TEC 2014 Mobile BI Buyer’s Guide.



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Mobile BI: State of the Market



Mobility in the Workplace

According to recent reports from Ericsson, data traffic through mobile devices increased by 28 percent globally between Q3 and Q4 of 2012, with 140 million new mobile subscriptions in Q4 of 2012. Mobile subscriptions worldwide had grown at a pace of 8 percent year over year by Q1 of 2013, and the number of mobile broadband subscriptions grew at a rate of 45 percent to reach around 1.7 billion. At this point, it is fair to say that the world has turned mobile, and there is no turning back. While regions such as Africa and Asia Pacific are seeing tremendous growth, there is no region in the world that has not seen important growth in mobile subscription rates. Mobile devices have been assimilated globally, and are here to stay.

As mobile devices gain a stronghold of virtually every aspect of life—we use them to communicate, play, read, buy, and even to wake up each morning—they have also come to play a big role in the workplace. Mobile devices can be used to perform common office tasks, such as sending e-mail, but they are increasingly being used to gain critical insight into business processes and help companies better service their customers. As software providers are adding mobile versions of their enterprise software solutions to their portfolios, organizations can realize the potential that these technologies offer in many areas of the business, such as customer relationship management (CRM), field service management (FSM), enterprise resource planning (ERP), and business analytics, to name a few. As a result, many mobile services have become a commodity and hence essential components for the operations of many organizations.

According to a recent Citrix Enterprise Mobility Report, companies of all sizes are already managing a large portfolio of mobile applications in their workflow. According to the survey the report is based on, organizations of all sizes have already incorporated, on average, 216 mobile applications into their departments, while small organizations use an average of 21 mobile apps and medium-sized companies use 141 mobile apps. Some organizations report having up to 337 mobile apps already in use.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2014 Mobile BI Buyer’s Guide.

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Partnerships with Vendors and Independent Software Vendors: Rejuvenating Legacy Systems


The rapid pace of global business places a unique set of challenges on all enterprises looking to improve and automate their operations, and at the same time, remain poised to adapt quickly to change.

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Focus Experts’ Briefing: BI Data and Metrics


Business intelligence (BI) solutions can help businesses to become more intelligent about key operations and processes. But BI solutions are only as valuable as the data that is fed into them and the key performance indicators (KPIs) they monitor. Well-chosen KPIs and quality data ensure that BI solutions generate reliable, actionable information. Find out how to get the best information into and out of your BI solutions.

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Business Intelligence (BI)


Business intelligence (BI) and performance management applications enable real-time, interactive access, analysis, and manipulation of mission-critical corporate information. These applications provide users with valuable insights into key operating information to quickly identify business problems and opportunities. Users are able to access and leverage vast amounts of information to analyze relationships and understand trends that ultimately support business decisions. These tools prevent the potential loss of knowledge within the enterprise that results from massive information accumulation that is not readily accessible or in a usable form. It is an umbrella term that ties together other closely related data disciplines including data mining, statistical analysis, forecasting, and decision support.

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