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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 listing brand business intelligence tools


Geocoding: Acquiring Location Intelligence to Make Better Business Decisions
By geocoding your address data, you have the location intelligence that helps you see patterns and create new opportunities to grow your business. There are

listing brand business intelligence tools  miles and display a listing of local retailers that sell the Dansko brand — right down to the shoe style and color level. To do this, Dansko checks its shipping history to see if a set minimum quantity of a particular shoe/color was shipped. This provides a good indication that the retailer has the shoe in stock. Tax Jurisdiction and Insurance For businesses in the insurance, electric and gas utilities, telecommunications, retail operations and services — determining tax jurisdiction can be a

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Business Intelligence (BI)

Business intelligence (BI) and performance management applications enable real-time, interactive access, analysis, and manipulation of mission-critical corporate information. These applications provide users with valuable insights into key operating information to quickly identify business problems and opportunities. Users are able to access and leverage vast amounts of information to analyze relationships and understand trends that ultimately support business decisions. These tools prevent the potential loss of knowledge within the enterprise that results from massive information accumulation that is not readily accessible or in a usable form. It is an umbrella term that ties together other closely related data disciplines including data mining, statistical analysis, forecasting, and decision support. 

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Aligning Business with IT through IT Portfolio Management and IT Governance


When business uncertainties are frequent and compliance with regulations is mandatory, it can be a challenge to keep information technology (IT) synchronized with strategy for maximum business value—while reducing IT cost. An IT portfolio management framework, coupled with an IT governance framework, can provide visibility into projects and IT assets, keeping them aligned to business objectives at all times.

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Maximizer Enterprise 8: A Strong Competitor on the SMB Front Line


TEC recently reviewed Maximizer Enterprise 8. Tailored to the latest Internet technology, the offering is aggressively priced. Rich functionality is offered in a three-module structure that continues to compete in the demanding "best fit," customer relationship management, small and medium enterprise marketplace.

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ERP Systems Buyer’s Guide


The implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system to automate business processes is a strategic investment. Buying the right system and choosing the best vendor for you are critical to a successful ERP implementation. As a decision maker, you need to quickly identify your ERP requirements, effectively communicate these needs to vendors, and successfully compare various product alternatives. Learn how.

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SaaS Buyer's Guide for Wholesale and Distribution


SaaS, despite its phenomenal popularity, is certainly not one-size-fits-all. You need to consider decision criteria such as fit, return on investment, and risk. Learn how SaaS works, who the major vendors are, how SaaS can help your business grow, and how to find the SaaS solution that’s right for you. It’s all in this comprehensive SaaS Buyer’s Guide for Wholesale and Distribution from TEC and SupplyChainBrain.

From a business requirements perspective, the defining characteristic of wholesale and distribution (W&D) organizations is that they operate as intermediate agents between manufacturers and retailers. Their top business needs thus focus on requirements for:

  • processing high volumes of transactions,
  • maintaining constant communication between upstream and downstream collaborators (manufacturers and retailers/customers, respectively), and
  • managing products for multiple competitors within the same warehouse or distribution center

In this guide we will explore considerations for W&D organizations that are considering adoption of the SaaS delivery model, and examine the particular business issues that arise from this change.Specifically, we will address the following considerations:

  • the differences between SaaS and on-premise delivery models
  • SaaS architectures
  • SaaS pros, cons, and other considerations
  • selection criteria for SaaS-based applications
  • viable wholesale and distribution SaaS vendors

Later in this guide, we’ll provide examples of SaaS delivery model success stories, as well as a SaaS IT directory, segmented according to business area.


Table of Contents


Preface

Software as a Service: A Buyer’s Guide


Spotlight on Adaptability and Agility

Thought Leadership from SAP
SAP’s Perspective on Software as a Service

SAP Case Study
Johnson Products Capitalizing on New Sales after 30-day SAP Deployment


Spotlight on Manufacturing and Distribution

Thought Leadership from Epicor
SaaS ERP for Small Manufacturers and Distributors

TECSYS Case Study
LifeScience Logistics Achieves 99.97% Inventory Accuracy with TECYS’ EliteSeries for Healthcare


Spotlight on Growing Your Company with SaaS

Thought Leadership from NetSuite
The Benefits of a Business Management Software Suite for High-growth and Midsized Businesses: Overcoming the Barriers of Stand-alone Business Applications

NetSuite Case Study
Woodworking Machinery Maker Cuts Costs, Grows Efficiency with NetSuite

NetSuite Case Study
NetSuite Helps Manufacturer Take Advantage of Fast Market Growth


Spotlight on Distribution Centers

Thought Leadership from Bond International Software
Cloud Computing for Your Distribution Workforce

IBS Case Study
Konaflex Focuses on its Core Business with IBS Distribution Management Software


Vendor Directory


Download the full copy of the TEC 2010 SaaS Buyer’s Guide for wholesale and distribution.



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What Are the Differences between the SaaS and On-premise Delivery Models?



Defining the on-premise delivery model is relatively straightforward:

  • The software is acquired by the customer up-front.
  • The software is installed, deployed, managed, and maintained at the customer’s site, generally with a great degree of involvement by the customer.
  • The customer provides the in-house infrastructure (e.g., servers, hardware, networks) to support the software.


Defining the SaaS model is slightly more complex, since different SaaS vendors offer different definitions. We’ll explore these variations in more detail shortly, but for now we’ll note the following SaaS characteristics:

  • The software vendor provides customers with access to the software via the Internet.
  • The customer pays for this service on a subscription basis (normally per user, per month, or per number of transactions).
  • The vendor is responsible for maintenance, upgrades, and software support, as well as the supporting infrastructure.

The major difference between the on-premise and SaaS delivery model lies in the ownership of the software. In the on-premise model, once the software is purchased, the customer owns it. In the SaaS delivery model, the software is not owned by the customer: it is provided to the customer in the same manner as any other service.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2010 SaaS Buyer’s Guide for wholesale and distribution.

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BUSINESS FIRST


BUSINESS FIRST is an open and visual application factory integrating business process management (BPM) and model-driven engineering (MDE) innovative technologies.  

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State of the Market: on-Demand Business Intelligence Solutions


Find out how the companies you re targeting are approaching SaaS-based BI solutions in On-demand Business Intelligence Solutions.

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Business Finance


Business Finance is a news source for finance executives. The company produces white papers, articles, videos, and newsletters. Its topics include corporate finance, risk management, and technology.

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2011 Business Intelligence Buyer's Guide: BI for Everyone


This buyer guide is intended for business owners, managers, decision makers, and anyone interested in learning about the deployment of business intelligence (BI) systems across large enterprises as well as small to medium businesses (SMBs). It presents a comprehensive view of the wide spectrum of BI software solutions currently available and investigates how they match different types of organizations according to size and need.

The guide addresses software solutions in three major groupings:

  • BI for large enterprises
  • BI for SMBs
  • Software-as-a-service (SaaS) BI offerings
The guide covers a wide range of BI solutions for almost all organizations, and anyone interested in a BI system should be able to identify a potential suitable solution. Each section contains specific information to help organizations research and analyze BI solutions, and make decisions about which BI software is a good fit for them.


Table of Contents


Preface

Business Intelligence: A Buyer’s Guide

SAP Customer Success Story
Marcus & Millichap Sharpens Reporting with SAP BusinessObjects Solution Portfolio

SAP Customer Success Story
Aquent Uses SAP BusinessObjects Software Tools to Deliver Talent

QlikView Customer Success Story
Fast Growing Company, Mayflex, Chooses IBM Cognos Express to Deliver Essential Business Intelligence and Planning Capability

MicroStrategy Customer Success Story
Using MicoStrategy Mobile to Perform Marketing and Consumer Shopping Behavior Analysis

Thought Leadership
SaaS BI Tools: Better Decision Making for the Rest of Us

SAP Special Report
The Business Information Revolution: Best-run Businesses Innovate Better with SAP

TEC Special Report
The Role of Business Intelligence in Content Strategies


Vendor Directory


Download the full copy of the TEC 2011 BI Buyer’s Guide for large enterprises and SMBs.



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Is BI Really for Everyone?


BI for Large Enterprises

Because of the nature of BI, which traditionally involved the incorporation of expensive high-end software technology, BI software systems were first deployed in large enterprises. To encompass the complete BI life cycle process, it was necessary to have strong budgets, as well as the means and justification for taking financial risks in order to gain a competitive advantage. To achieve this competitive advantage, many large companies were eager for software tools that would enable them to improve their decision-making process. Some software companies responded to this need by accelerating the evolution of classical decision support systems to provide sophisticated analysis tools with high-end software technology. Naturally, the high cost of these types of tools limited their accessibility to large-scale companies (also, the technical requirements for this technology could be met by big corporations only).

In the last four or five years, economic factors as well as the exponential growth of data volumes generated by organizations have forced the development of very sophisticated BI applications, and also expanded the kind of tools a classical BI system normally uses. The BI space is still growing and maturing, and large corporations are still demanding new solutions for new enterprise needs.


BI for SMBs

With recent economic conditions and the information boom, many smaller companies have found themselves requiring analysis tools that enable them to improve their business monitoring and performance improvement strategies. BI solution innovation has cascaded down from large companies to provide adapted and specific services to companies with a need for advanced analytic software tools but with very limited budgets. Recent BI tools have improved the BI life cycle to help organizations of every size and shape to improve analysis, data management, and data visualization tools.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2011 BI Buyer’s Guide for large enterprises and SMBs.

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SAP BusinessObjects Edge Business Intelligence: Business Intelligence (BI) Competitor Analysis Report


This business intelligence (BI) knowledge base covers a full range of BI functionality. BI applications enable real time, interactive access, analysis, and manipulation of mission-critical corporate information. BI users are able to access and leverage vast amounts of information to analyze relationships and understand trends that support business decisions. This knowledge base covers everything from data mining to analytics, querying, reporting, workflow, and in-depth analysis.

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Leveraging Employee Surveys to Influence Business Performance: Why the Employee Engagement Construct Is Important to Business Leaders


It is critical to have an understanding of how an organization’s investment in its talent management initiatives is returned, whether it influences the bottom line or other performance measures of an organization. An understanding of this return on investment (ROI) enables an organization to align its efforts for human capital management initiatives with those that can have the most influence on performance outcomes. It also helps the organization to prioritize its resource allocation efforts.

Employee survey responses can provide a valuable lens through which business outcomes and ROI perspectives can be clarified.

A significant body of research has emerged over the last couple of decades documenting the linkage between organizational and leadership practices and important business outcomes such as customer satisfaction and business performance. The more an organization displays a strong orientation toward serving the customer, places a clear emphasis on the quality of products and services, verifies that employees are well trained, and involves them in decision making, the more aligned employees are to the goals of the organization, the more cooperative their teamwork, the less likely they are to voluntarily resign, and the higher their engagement. Under these conditions, they are better positioned to deliver the organization’s value proposition and thus achieve organizational goals.

Studies show that improvements in employee engagement produce measurable improvements in business metrics. Read this white paper to learn why the employee engagement construct is so important to business leaders today.

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